November 11, 2010, 11:37 AM

Dear AT&T, what’s your secret sauce?

(Page 2 of 2)

You may have noticed that I’m focusing all of my attention on calls and texts, not 3G coverage. While 3G at times can be slow or simply unavailable, I don’t expect a 3G wireless network to be perfect—at least not yet. I receive good 3G coverage—what I would expect—though I can’t say I’m not excited for the chance to get 4 of those G’s. Additionally, this is my first smartphone, besides a BlackBerry a few years ago, so I don’t know how other 3G networks compare. I hope to explore this soon in a follow-up blog post.

So, why would Apple (which makes much of its revenue from the iPhone) and Microsoft (which spent a whopping $400 million on the marketing campaign alone for Windows Phone 7) choose to offer their most advanced devices on what from my experience is a bottom-tier wireless network? I don’t know. What I do know is that I want AT&T’s sales and marketing team if I start my own business. Until then, I’ve resigned to love my iPhone and complain about the network it is on. At least, that is, until I can switch to Verizon.

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