April 10, 2006, 12:00 AM

Joan Broughton joins Shop.org in charge of content and education

Joan Broughton, former vice president of multi-channel programs and head of e-commerce for outdoor sports co-op Recreational Equipment Inc., has joined the staff of Shop.org as vice president of content and education.

Joan Broughton, former vice president of multi-channel programs and head of e-commerce for outdoor sports co-op Recreational Equipment Inc., has joined the staff of Shop.org as vice president of content and education.

Broughton will create and deliver information to all Shop.org members and will oversee all Shop.org events, including identifying speakers, and developing format, content and networking for all its conferences, retailer-only workshops, tele-seminars, and regional events and meetings. Broughton will also oversee Shop.org research and publications.

“Shop.org prides itself on delivering the very best content, education and information-sharing opportunities to our members,” said Shop.org Executive Director Scott Silverman. “Adding an accomplished e-commerce executive and Internet veteran like Joan to our team demonstrates the importance Shop.org places on the delivery of relevant and valuable information to our members.”

At REI, Broughton managed web site operations and REI Adventures. She also launched the “order online, pickup at a store” option. Before REI, Broughton worked with Office Depot where she was director of web publishing. She has spent 15 years in the online and Internet industry including roles at O’Reilly & Associates and America Online.

Broughton served on the Shop.org Board of Directors from 2003 to 2005.

Shop.org, part of the National Retail Federation, is a trade association of online retailers with 600

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