May 29, 2001, 12:00 AM

Web tie-ups drive demand for content delivery apps, says new report

The market for technology that will speed up delivery of content on the web--a major concern for retailers--will explode from $1 billion in 2000 to $12 billion by 2007, Frost & Sullivan predicts.

The market for technology that will speed up delivery of content on the web will explode from just under $1 billion in 2000 to more than $12 billion by 2007, analysts and researchers Frost & Sullivan predict. Speeding up content is a major concern of the online retail industry. Industry research says that retailers lose significant sales if their content is slow to download to a user’s screen.

"Despite the opportunity, participants (vendors of content acceleration technology) must educate their customers to realize the market`s potential," says Frost & Sullivan IT Analyst Jarad Carleton. "Profitability is back in fashion and failing to show the cost savings of a solution along with its performance enhancements could be fatal."

The enterprise market regards content delivery as a waste of resources, Frost & Sullivan says. Most enterprises are reluctant to spend capital for infrastructure improvements, the company reports. "Content delivery sellers must quantify their advantages and express them in terms that buyers understand," says Carleton. "If your company cannot provide basic data regarding potential cost savings as a result of implementing your solution, you will not succeed in this market."

 

Frost & Sullivan (www.IT.frost.com) has published its findings in a new report, "U.S. Internet Content Delivery Markets."

 

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

From The IR Blog

FPO

Patrick Cartmel / Mobile Commerce

Debunking the three biggest myths about m-commerce marketing

Consumers are shopping on their smartphones, but marketers have to look at mobile advertising different ...

FPO

John Giordano / E-Commerce

The psychology of color in international marketing

A color that means one thing in one society can mean the opposite in another. ...

Advertisement