April 12, 2001, 12:00 AM

Blue-collar workers are the fastest growing segment of web users

Home Internet access for blue-collar workers grew faster than any other occupational group, surging 52% since March 2000, says the Internet ratings report for March 2001 from Nielsen//NetRatings.

Home Internet access for blue-collar workers grew faster than any other occupational group, surging 52% since March 2000, says the Internet ratings report for March 2001 from Nielsen//NetRatings.

The growth rate for factory operators and laborers was more than double the rate of Internet growth. Overall, the Internet grew 25% since last March.

Factory operators and laborers accounted for 9.5 million of the total Internet population who accessed the Web in March 2001, compared to 6.2 million during the same month last year.

Homemakers were the second fastest growing group, jumping 49% in the past year to 2.5 million users. Internet users working in the service field grew 37% or 2.9 million, while workers in sales rose 37% to more than 5.6 million. Workers in the clerical or administrative field rounded out the top five growth categories, with more than 5.5 million having access to the web from home.

"The Internet was, at first, an elitist country club reserved only for individuals with select financial abilities and technical skills," said Sean Kaldor, vice president of e-commerce, NetRatings. "Now, nearly every socio-economic group is aggressively adopting the web, having a fundamental impact on e-commerce, online advertising, and more. This continues to open up new mid-market opportunities for mass merchandising, consumer packaged goods marketing, and value-conscious e-commerce."

 

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