June 3, 2010, 2:52 PM

Wheeled shoe designer Heelys launches redesigned site

The site features enhanced retailer links.

Lead Photo

Heelys Inc., which designs, markets and distributes shoes with small, removable wheels in the heel, has launched a redesigned web site that enables shoppers to share videos, find retailers that sell Heelys current products and buy the brand’s classic styles.

Heelys designed the site in-house, and the project took about two and a half months.  

The manufacturer doesn’t sell its current styles on its site. Instead it refers shoppers to buy products from other retailers, including Zappos.com and bricks-and-mortar stores. When a shopper is on a product page and clicks on the Buy Now button, located in the upper right hand corner of the product description, the site shows her the retailers that sell the particular product. Shoppers can click a link to be sent to that retailer’s site. Shoppers also can use the find-a-store feature to search for nearby retailers via Google maps.

The site does sell about 100 of its classic styles on the site. “The Heelys Shop only sells our classic shoes that are no longer shipping to retail stores,” says Rick Groesch, vice president of brand engagement.

The site allows consumers to sort items by features, colors, wheel type and retailers.

“The wheel finder was also improved to take the hassle out of trying to figure out what size replacement a user would need,” says Groesch.   “All a user has to do now is enter in their shoe style and size, and they’ll automatically be given the specific size and wheel type they’ll need when buying a replacement.”

Fans of the Heelys brand also can submit home videos of moves made while wearing the shoes by clicking on Submit Your Videos button on the Heelys home page. The shoe company says the best videos will be featured on the site.  The redesigned site also enables consumers to connect to the brand’s presences on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

“We’ve improved our social networking strategy to have our employees to reach out and interact with fans directly on our Facebook and Twitter accounts, whether it be sharing a link to a cool video, giving advice on how to pull off a trick, or helping to find a particular style of shoe,” he says.

comments powered by Disqus

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

From IR Blogs

FPO

Jake Nickell / E-Commerce

What one web retailer learned from a bricks-and-mortar test

Threadless has closed its one physical store but found other ways to get its artist-designed ...

FPO

Devika Girish / E-Commerce

Eight lesser-known uses of beacons for retailers

Beacons, which communicate with consumers’ smartphones, are most often used to welcome shoppers to stores ...

Advertisement