April 5, 2010, 12:00 AM

Backcountry.com looks within for its new chief operating officer

The outdoor gear merchant has promoted vice president of product management Jill Layfield to chief operating officer. The company also expanded the roles of several other executives in an effort to streamline the company’s internal operations teams.

 

Outdoor gear merchant Backcountry.com has promoted vice president of product management Jill Layfield to chief operating officer. Layfield will oversee the company’s day-to-day operations.

 

“She is a confident, focused leader with the ability to turn complex issues into manageable challenges, and to make any lofty goal achievable through step-by-step processes,” says CEO Jim Holland.

The company also announced that it has expanded the roles of several other executives in an effort to improve the company’s internal operations teams. The new positions are:

     

  • Chief marketing officer Dustin Robertson will add oversight of the Backcountry’s corporate development department to his responsibilities.
  • Chief financial officer Scott Klossner was promoted to chief financial officer and senior vice president of supply chain operations.
  • Sam Bruni was promoted from director of the company’s “One deal at a time” division to general manager of business unit operations.

 

“We have recognized the need to be a dynamic company with strong leadership,” says Holland. “We are confident that the changes we are announcing today will make Backcountry stronger, better and ready to forge ahead as the best core gear e-tailer.”

Backcountry is a subsidiary of Liberty Media Corp.

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