June 27, 2008, 12:00 AM

Online searchers like to offer shopping advice, Bigresearch says

Consumers who search online are more likely to offer advice on what they have purchased, according to a survey by market research firm Bigresearch LLC. They also are younger and more affluent than average, and more apt to consider a high-ticket purchase.

Consumers who search online are more likely to offer advice on the products and services they have purchased, according to a survey by market research firm Bigresearch LLC. They also are younger and more affluent than average, and more likely to be considering a high-ticket purchase.

47.0% of those who regularly search online say they frequently offer others advice about products and services they have purchased, versus 29.4% of all adults, according to a Bigresearch survey last December of 15,727 consumers.

“Consumers who research products online appear to be more knowledgeable and eager to share information,” says Gary Drenik, president of Bigresearch. “Because they are likely to tell a friend about their experience, they become a building block for viral marketing efforts.”

Online searchers skew younger, with an average age of 43.2 compared with 44.8 for all adults surveyed. They are also more affluent, with an average household income of $65,500 vs. $56,811, and 32.2% describe their positions as professional or managerial vs. 25.5% of all respondents.

Those who use search regularly are also more likely to be in the market for high-ticket items. For instance 23.3% of searchers say they plan to buy a TV in the next six months vs. 17.8% of all adults; they also are more likely (22.9% vs. 16.7%) to be planning a computer purchase, according to the Bigresearch data.

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