October 17, 2007, 12:00 AM

Napster wants subscribers tuning in and turning on its latest platform

Napster 4.0 eliminates the need for subscribers to download software to their PC in order to select and play music from the company’s catalog of more than 5 million songs. Instead subscribers now can access and play music from any web-enabled computer.

After rethinking the way it delivers content, Napster Inc. is launching a new web-based music platform.

The platform, Napster 4.0, eliminates the need for subscribers to download software to their personal computer in order to select and play music from the company’s catalog of more than 5 million songs. Instead subscribers can now access and play music from any web-enabled computer.

The new platform includes Napster automix, a suite of music recommendation and discovery tools, and pre-programmed playlists from a variety of different music categories. The platform has a client user interface that mirrors a web-based service, says Napster. As a result subscribers with personal computers can use the client to manage their music collection, rip and burn CDs and transfer tracks to a compatible portable device. Napster 4.0 also gives Apple Macintosh and Linux users for the first time the ability to stream music from its subscription service, Napster says.

“Napster has a product roadmap encompassing the online, mobile and home entertainment environments,” says CEO Chris Gorog. “The development of the web-based architecture allows us to explore opportunities with a variety of other web properties and Internet-connected devices.” Napster is No. 108 in the Internet Retailer Top 500 Guide.

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