March 14, 2006, 12:00 AM

Fridays lead in e-mail open rates, ExactTarget study reports

The average open rates for e-mail messages sent on Friday was 39.6%, a tad higher than No. 2 Thursday. Sundays experienced the highest click-through rates.

 

Conventional wisdom among e-mail marketers is that people don’t read their e-mails on Friday. Au contraire, says a new report from ExactTarget, Fridays experience the highest open rates for e-mail messages.

The average open rates for e-mail messages sent on Friday was 39.6%, a tad higher than No. 2 Thursday, with 39%. Friday held the spot as the day with the highest open rate for 14 months in a test that included 230,000 e-mail campaigns and 2.7 billion messages from 4,000 marketing organizations.

"ExactTarget`s 2004 study asserted that there is no such thing as a universal best day to send e-mail, and we still hold this view,” said Morgan Stewart, director of strategic services at ExactTarget and author of the study. “The results of our 2005 study show that organizations still must conduct their own tests to determine which day of the week works best for them, but all organizations should consider Friday and Sunday as viable challengers.”

Open rates by day of the week were:
Sunday, 33.5%
Monday, 37.9%
Tuesday, 38.4%
Wednesday, 38.4%
Thursday, 39%
Friday, 39.6%
Saturday, 31.5%

Fridays may have led on open rates, but Sundays had the highest click-through rate at 6.9%.

Click-through rates by day of the week were:
Sunday, 6.9%
Monday, 6.4%
Tuesday, 6.3%
Wednesday, 6.1%
Thursday, 6.4%
Friday, 6.5%
Saturday, 6.1%

 

 

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