February 28, 2006, 12:00 AM

Front and Center

(Page 3 of 3)

After integrating the database to the order management system vendors typically provide hands-on training with key staff, and in some cases, a handful of top executives, to provide the retailer with a top-to-bottom understanding of the system’s workings. Once the system goes live, business rules can be changed based on the retailer’s preferences.

Simple to use

“The key is to make the system so simple to use, that even the newest employee can figure out how to navigate it and see that the transaction gets completed, not dropped,” adds Maher.

Looking ahead, order management systems are expected to provide retailers with more transaction data that can be used to further improve operating efficiencies, reduce stocking costs and create more targeted marketing and merchandising campaigns.

“There is going to be more of a convergence between e-commerce and the physical point-of-sale and that will create pressure to deliver order management systems that get retailers the transaction data they need to better service their customers,” says LaGarde.

Peter Lucas is a Highland Park, Ill.-based freelance business writer.

Click Here for the Internet Retailer Guide to Order Management Products and Services

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