September 7, 2005, 12:00 AM

Consumers hesitant to buy clothes online, Gallup says

Despite the growth of e-commerce, most consumers still prefer to buy apparel in retail stores, according to a recent Gallup Poll. In a survey of more than 7,000 adults, Gallup found that only 9% prefer to buy apparel online.

Despite the growth of e-commerce, most consumers still prefer to buy clothing and apparel in retail stores, according to a recent Gallup Poll. In a survey of more than 7,000 adults, Gallup found that only 9% prefer to buy apparel online while 77% prefer to make such purchases at stores.

Older shoppers were more hesitant to purchase clothes at Internet stores than younger consumers, Gallup found. 81% of those aged 50 years and older expressed reservations about buying clothing online, compared with 73% of those under age 50.

51% agreed that shopping on the Internet didn’t fit their shopping style, including 37% who strongly agreed. Older consumers were more likely to agree that e-commerce isn’t their style-57% of those aged 50 and older compared with 43% of those ages 21 to 49, according to Gallup.

Shoppers’ desire to try on clothing-62% said they usually try on clothes before making a purchase-is one reason they prefer shopping in retail stores, Gallup says. “Shopping online cannot replace the experience of actually touching, trying on, and using the product before purchasing, which allows brick-and-mortar stores to continue to be the true retailing experience,” said Kurt Deneen, Gallup retail industry consultant.

But fears of identity theft also play a role-44% of respondents said they agree that shopping on the Internet produces more credit card theft.

 

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