September 7, 2005, 12:00 AM

Apple launches refined iTunes and new iPod

Apple has launched iTunes 5, the latest version of its digital music service, with a new search bar and other features, and introduced the iPod nano, a pencil-thin version of the regular iPod music player.

Paul Demery

Managing Editor, B2B E-commerce

Apple Computer Inc. has launched iTunes 5, the latest version of its digital music service, with a new search bar and other features, and introduced the iPod nano, a full-featured, pencil-thin version of the regular iPod music player.

“iPod nano is the biggest revolution since the original iPod,” said CEO Steve Jobs. “iPod nano is a full-featured iPod in an impossibly small size, and it’s going to change the rules for the entire portable music market.”

The iPod nano, which weighs 1.5 ounces and is thinner than a No. 2 pencil, can hold up to 1,000 songs in its 4GB version, which retails for $$249. A 2GB version holds up to 500 songs and retails for $199.

The newest iPod also integrates with the iTunes Music Store at Apple.com/itunes. The redesigned iTunes includes features that make it easier to search for songs within a catalog of 2 million songs, 15,000 Podcasts and 10,000 audiobooks within the iTunes Music Store. Other new features let users organize playlists into folders, control random playback of music tracks, and set parental controls.

Apple, No. 17 in the Internet Retailer Top 400 Guide to Retail Web Sites, says its customers have downloaded more than 500 million songs.

 

 

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