August 9, 2005, 12:00 AM

Average response time for top 15 e-retailers increases in July, Gomez says

The benchmark average response time for online retail transactions at 15 leading web sites increased by more than one second in July, to 20.16 seconds from 18.59 seconds in June, Gomez Inc. reports.

 

The benchmark average response time for online retail transactions at 15 leading web sites increased by more than one second in July, to 20.16 seconds from 18.59 seconds in June, Gomez Inc. reports.

Most retailers in the list stayed close to their prior month’s response time, but a few retailers, including Dell, HP and CDW, experienced increases.

Office Depot continued to show the fastest response time at 6.35 seconds, compared to 6.38 in June, followed by J.C. Penney and Best Buy.

The July response times in seconds for all 15 retailers:
Office Depot, 6.35
J.C. Penney, 11.38
Best Buy, 14.60
Walmart.com, 14.87
Target, 15.36
Gap Online, 15.76
Staples, 15.89
Amazon, 16.35
CDW, 19.39
Sears, 21.34
Lands’ End, 21.55
Office Max, 24.41
HP, 29.01
Dell, 33.38
Sony, 42.75

Sony led in the success rate, which measures the availability of web pages.

Success rates for all 15 retailers:
Sony, 98.86%
Sears, 98.70%
Office Max, 98.63%
J.C. Penney, 98.52%
Target, 98.49%
Amazon, 98.40%
Walmart.com, 98.40%
Gap Online, 98.32%
Lands’ End, 98.14%
CDW, 98.12%
Office Depot, 97.82%
Best Buy, 97.69%
Staples, 93.30%
HP, 92.56%.

The retail transaction response times are fastest-possible times recorded by software agents from 10 Gomez Internet backbones located throughout the U.S., measuring the time from entering a web site to the point of purchase. Gomez abandons the site before clicking the final check-out button to avoid the actual monetary transaction.

Response time and availability can be impacted by the location of a retailer’s data centers, the condition of its servers, and the number of steps needed to complete a shopping cart transaction, Gomez says. They can also be impacted by such factors as page weight (e.g., the size of pages, and whether they include full or heavy image files), 3rd-party relationships (how fast content servers, security vendors, etc., complete their obligations), and complexity of the transaction (e.g., how many back-end processes need to occur).

 

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